Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an evening at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (1-2) scored fewer runs than the Los Angeles Dodgers (2-1) last night at Dodger Stadium, 3-1.

Trevor Cahill (0-1, 3.18) pitched five and two-thirds innings, giving up three runs (two earned) on five hits and three walks with seven strikeouts. In the first inning, Adrian Gonzalez‘s ground-rule double scored Corey Seager and Logan Forsythe reached on a fielding error by Wil Myers, allowing Gonzalez to cross the plate. Yasiel Puig hit a solo home run in the fourth inning.

Rich Hill (1-0, 1.80) surrendered one run on two hits and three walks in five innings, striking out five. The lone run came on Hunter Renfroe‘s first home run of the season, a solo shot in the fourth inning.

This afternoon’s series finale at Dodger Stadium has Jered Weaver (0-0) making his Padres debut against Brandon McCarthy (0-0). First pitch is set for 12:10pm PDT.


Recaps

Padres can’t get bats going vs. Dodgers – AJ Cassavell and Ken Gurnick (MLB.com)

Trevor Cahill solid in debut, but Padres fall to Dodgers – Dennis Lin (The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Hill starts strong, Puig homers and Dodgers beat Padres 3-1 – Tom Connolly (The Associated Press)

Yasiel Puig homers in Dodgers’ 3-1 win against Padres – Andy McCullough (Los Angeles Times)

MLB Box Score


Photos

San Diego Padres' shortstop Erick Aybar, right, makes the relay over Los Angeles Dodgers' Joc Pederson in time to get Yasmani Grandal at first for a double play during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Wednesday, April 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)

San Diego Padres’ shortstop Erick Aybar, right, makes the relay over Los Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson in time to get Yasmani Grandal at first for a double play during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Wednesday, April 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)

Los Angeles Dodgers' first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, right, tags out San Diego Padres' Trevor Cahill on a sacrifice bunt during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Wednesday, April 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)

Los Angeles Dodgers’ first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, right, tags out San Diego Padres’ Trevor Cahill on a sacrifice bunt during the fifth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Wednesday, April 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)

San Diego Padres' Wil Myers reacts after hitting a fly ball for an out to center against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the eighth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Wednesday, April 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)

San Diego Padres’ Wil Myers reacts after hitting a fly ball for an out to center against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the eighth inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Wednesday, April 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)


Tweets


Videos

Renfroe’s solo homer

Cahill K’s Forsythe to end 5th


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  • ballybunion

    Cahill looked pretty good. He’s going to strike out a bunch, and walk a few, but it looks like he’ll need a few runs to work with in order to get some wins. It’s all very encouraging so far, but I can do without the pitcher hitting 8th: two tries, zero wins. Just put Jank at the top with Margot, where he belongs. The secret to Dick Williams managing was to put a set lineup out there day after day, and let them get used to playing together and hitting in front of and behind the same guys. I hope Andy Green gives that strategy a long look.

    • USMC53

      Green has had Jankowski in the 9-hole against lefties, because Jankowski absolutely can’t hit lefties (.398 OPS against them last year). Makes sense to me to bat him 9th against LHH. He’ll be leadoff or #2 against RHH, so more often than not.

      • GT500KR

        That was 84 at-bats, which is nowhere near enough to say he can’t hit lefties.

        This year is about finding stuff out. I’d let Jank hit against everybody as often as possible so we know what we have.

        I don’t buy the “set lineup” argument. Earl Weaver won more than Dick Williams and Weaver switched lineups all the time; if you have a really talented lineup, of course you wouldn’t need to change it as often.

      • ballybunion

        Earl Weaver managed four Hall Of Famers, three Cy Young Award winners, Two league MVPs and two Rookies of The Year, along with several perennial all-stars in just a decade with Baltimore. Dick Williams wasn’t that lucky, especially with pitching staff he was given. Besides, Williams preferred young players who didn’t have the standing to challenge him.

        I’ve wondered HOW Dick Williams was so successful, since he expected his starters to go the distance, used his closers as old-fashioned firemen, let his reserves rot on the bench for a week or more and then expect them to perform, and would scream at players in the dugout for mistakes.The only thing he did consistently was play a set lineup of position players, only occasionally switching spots in the batting order.

        Otherwise, his players played every inning of every game. That was the only thing he did as a manager that made *some* sense, playing together as a unit, so I’ve concluded that was his “secret”. He won pennants in three different cities with different types of teams, so if you’ve got a better explanation…

      • GT500KR

        In Oakland, Williams had Reggie Jackson (MVP, HoF), Campanaris (53 career WAR), Vida Blue (MVP, Cy Young), Catfish Hunter (Cy Young, HoF), Bando (61 career WAR), Rollie Fingers (HoF), and All-Stars like Rudi, Hendricks, Holtzman, and others.

        When Williams had talented teams, he won. When his teams weren’t talented (Angels, some of Montreal, some of San Diego) playing the same lineup all the time didn’t give him an advantage. Weaver was the manager who could take a collection of lesser players and win, because he could combine two or three lesser players into one good composite.