There has been a (nearly) total lack of any interesting Padres news coming out of the Winter Meetings this year. Unless you count Dick Enberg receiving the Ford C. Frick Award or A.J. Preller’s broken computer. Which I don’t, obviously.  Quite frankly, everyone else on Padres Public has done a much better job of analyzing nothing this week than I ever could.

So let’s have a bit of mindless fun, shall we?


This past year saw Alesmith Brewing releasing a collaboration with the late Tony Gwynn on a new beer, .394 San Diego Pale Ale.  If you haven’t had a chance to try it yet, I recommend you get to Alesmith’s Miramar tasting room and do so at your earliest convenience.  It is a mighty tasty beer.

This brought up an interesting topic to examine:

What could local breweries do to honor other Padres players with their own beer?

Well, maybe not interesting, per se.  But what else are we supposed to talk about?

*My only rule:  You won’t see anything about Eric Show or Alan Wiggins or anyone else that ever publicly had a problem with substance abuse.  That’s a line that I won’t cross.

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The Ducksnorts 2008 Baseball Annual included a section called “Overlooked ex-Padres.” I’d wanted to call attention to four players–Ollie Brown, Mike Ivie, Ruppert Jones, and Bip Roberts–that maybe didn’t get their due in San Diego. The idea was noble, but the execution could have been better.

Since I’ve spent much of the offseason writing player comments for Baseball Prospectus 2015 (#ShamelessPlug), I’m in the mind-set of condensing a man’s contributions to his team into a short paragraph with snappy phrases. In that vein, I thought it might be fun to revisit those players from DS2008 and write capsules for each of their seasons with the Padres.

First on the agenda: Ollie Brown.

BP1969

Selected as the first pick overall in last year’s expansion draft, Brown–the older brother of Braves prospect Oscar Brown–is expected to be the Padres’ everyday right fielder. Don’t be fooled by his .249/.303/.350 line in sporadic playing time with the Giants over the last four seasons. He led the California League in homers and SLG back in ’64 and is still only 25 years old. Despite being a right-handed hitter, he has struggled thus far against lefties at the highest level, but that could just be a sample size issue. Now freed from having to look over his shoulder at the younger and more exciting Bobby Bonds, Brown should thrive in his new home.

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