Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an afternoon at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (5-8) scored fewer runs than the Atlanta Braves (5-6), 9-2, yesterday at SunTrust Park.

Trevor Cahill (0-2, 4.76) pitched five and two-thirds innings, giving up four runs on four hits and three walk while striking out eight. Adonis Garcia scored on Tyler Flowers‘ single in the fifth inning. In the sixth inning, a single by Brandon Phillips drove in Ender Inciarte and Freddie Freeman. After Miguel Diaz balked in a run in the seventh inning, Inciarte hit a solo home run. In the eight inning, Freeman scored on a Nick Markakis double, Markakis scored on a Phillips single, and Phillips scored on Johan Carmago’s single.

Bartolo Colon (1-1, 4.24) gave up one run on one hit and a walk with six strikeouts in seven innings. Ryan Schimpf was the Padres’ offense, hitting a solo home run in the second inning and scoring on a passed ball on a walk to Erick Aybar in the eighth inning.

The Padres will attempt to avoid the four-game sweep in tonight’s series finale. Jered Weaver (0-1, 4.91) will take the mound against Jaime Garcia (0-1, 5.73) starting at 4:35pm PDT.

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The Hangover is a place to discuss a storyline or two from the previous day’s game.

Somewhere in the middle of another Opening Day mess, a hero emerged:

It took Miguel Diaz four years to get out of the rookie ball levels of the Milwaukee Brewers farm system, not necessarily a rarity for a young, international arm. Diaz finally reached the lower rung of Single-A ball last season, putting together an all-around fine season for a 21-year-old: 94 2/3 innings, 91 strikeouts, 29 walks, 7 home runs, a 3.71 ERA.

The likely plan, before the Padres got involved, probably involved Diaz reporting back to Low-A Wisconsin or High-A Carolina this spring and then, someday, Double-A Biloxi. If everything went smoothly at each stop—injuries were dodged, performance improved—Diaz would have had a shot at Triple-A, and maybe the majors, at some point in 2018. But everyone would be taking it one day at a time—er, one pitch at a time—in the relative anonymity of the minor leagues, dreams of The Show just ever-present background noise on long bus rides.

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Saturday was the annual Padres FanFest. Originally, I was going to write a recap of my day. But I was so bored there I didn’t even bother taking any notes and only took a couple of photos. I’ll let Ryan sum up the rest of my feelings on the last few FanFests:

Now that we have that (not unexpected) disappointment out of the way, I ended up going to Bub’s at the Ballpark with your good friend and mine, Nathan Zack. The plan was to meet Dave and Laura Perek there, which has become sort of an annual tradition for Nathan whenever he’s in town. I had never met Dave or Laura before, even though we’ve followed each other on Twitter for years, so I was excited to finally get to do that.

Over the course of the two hours we spent at Bub’s, I was introduced to a little game the three of them play amongst themselves where they make predictions about the upcoming season. I was intrigued, to say the least, so I joined them for this year’s edition.

What follows is all of our selections for this game. We don’t know how it’s going to end yet, but I’m pretty sure I nailed every category. I’ve put my selections in bold.

There are no stakes. There is no prize. It’s all for fun.

So, relax, let’s have some fun out here! This game’s fun, OK?

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As we speculated last night, the Padres were active in today’s Rule 5 draft, although they didn’t grab any of the players we suggested (outside of a brief encounter with Justin Haley). A series of trades netted San Diego the top three players selected in the draft, an unprecedented Rule 5 romp. Here are those players:

Miguel Diaz, RHP, Brewers

Diaz is a 22-year-old righty who spent spent four years in rookie ball before jumping to Single-A last season. The results were largely impressive: in 94 2/3 innings, Diaz posted a 3.14 strikeout-to-walk ratio while surrendering just seven home runs. Ultimately, with young players and limited pro experience, scouting reports often provide a better glimpse than the stats. Grant Jones scouted Diaz back in June at Baseball Prospectus, clocking him at 95-96 with the fastball (he touched 98) while handing out positives marks on both the slider and change.

It’s not a surprising pick. As we discussed last night, Preller and the Padres love power arms, and Diaz definitely qualifies. While it makes some sense to slot Diaz right into the starting rotation, if he sticks, it wouldn’t be surprising if the Padres started him off in the bullpen, where they can more easily limit high-stress innings and keep the pressure low.

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