Sometimes, things get a little fuzzy after a night at the pub.  Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed While You Were Drinking.

The San Diego Padres feted Benito Santiago and Garry Templeton before Saturday’s game, inducting both into the Padres Hall of Fame.  They each spoke from the heart, thanking the organization, their families, and the fans for their support while they played here.

The ceremony meant the game started 20 min late.  Whether or not the delay caused Tyson Ross (8-9) to lose the feel of his slider at first pitch only he knows, but he came out flat in the first inning.  It seems to me Ross usually struggles with slider command the first inning or two, but what do I know.  Tyson allowed two early runs and the Padres (52-59) never recovered, losing 4-2 to the Philadelphia Phillies (44-67) in front of an announced sellout crowd of 44,567.

Funny thing – Ted Leitner talked about catcher Santiago throwing runners out from his knees during his playing career, and described one such instance against former St Louis Cardinals speedster Vince Coleman.  Those of you too young to have seen Coleman play before he got run over by a tarp caught a glimpse of how fast he was watching Odubel Herrera circle the bases.  After singling to drive in Chase Utley with the Phillies first run, Herrera stole second.  Then he took third while Clint Barmes‘ throw was on the way to first to retire Maikel Franco.  Finally Herrera scored on a wild pitch from Ross.  In the third he singled and stole second again.  Derek Norris finally cut him down when he tried to steal with two out in the eighth.

Philly starter Adam Morgan (3-3) retired the first 9 Padres he faced, but ran into trouble in the fourth.  Consecutive singles by Yangervis Solarte and Norris put runners at the corners with no one out. Matt Kemp singled in Solarte; when Herrera bobbled the ball in center, Norris tried for third.  He was out by 10 feet.  That cost the Padres a run, for Justin Upton followed with a walk and Jedd Gyorko flied out to the wall in CF.

It remained 3-1 until the sixth.  Upton singled and took second when Cody Asche bobbled the ball.  Gyorko singled off Chase Utley’s glove, driving in Upton.  The Padres threatened again in the seventh; Barmes singled, and Melvin Upton Jr. followed with a bunt single.  He was trying to sacrifice, but the throw hit him in the butt.  He may have been out of the baseline; that play is not reviewable (!).  Ross, left in to bunt because the Padres had only a 4-man bench (per Pat Murphy post-game comments), popped the bunt up to third.  Solarte flied out and Norris grounded out to kill the rally.

Philadelphia pushed an insurance run across in the eighth thanks to consecutive extra base hits from Utley (double) and Cesar Hernandez (triple).

Sunday Jerome Williams (3-8, 6.09) faces Andrew Cashner (4-11, 4.08) as the Padres look to break their 5-game losing streak and avoid being swept.

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Here’s some stuff I read this week that you might enjoy:

  • The Commissioner Speaks: Imagining a Redefined Strike Zone (Hardball Times) – Jon Roegele takes a closer look at balls and strikes. This is a long read, with many fascinating tidbits, including the fact that the strike zone is now larger and lower than it was 5 years ago. In a bizarre coincidence, strikeouts are up and scoring is down. Another finding that will disappoint those who would embrace our robot ump overlords is that plate umpires have improved their accuracy over that same period. There’s lots more in here; it’s well worth your time.
  • Jumpsteady (Wax Pack) – Brad Balukjian has started his road trip that will end with a book being written about the experience. The linked article focuses on San Marcos resident and recent Padres Hall of Fame inductee Garry Templeton. The Tempy experience continues here. Former Padres Gary Pettis and Randy Ready also make appearances. (Click the names, this is the Internet.)
  • Cody Decker of the El Paso Chihuahuas is an all-star on and off the field (El Paso Times) – Chihuahuas’ General Manager Brad Taylor has high praise for the young man, who is arguably a better option than Matt Kemp at this point: “I’ve never seen, in my 21 years in Minor League Baseball, a player connect to the community and the community connect to the player — two-way street — like Cody has to El Paso and El Paso has to Cody.” [h/t Keith Olbermann, via Steve Kaplowitz]
  • GM Preller expects better baseball ahead (Padres.com) – Bully for him. Failing that, he can try moving some guys, although maybe we’re not there yet. The difference between last year’s team and this year’s is that now the players are much more expensive. Good luck finding someone to take Kemp or the lousy Upton. This is why my vision of the future is bleak. And while it’s nice to hear that Ron Fowler and the Padres remain “committed to winning,” right now their level of commitment is less of a concern than their level of competence. Could the “spend money, hope something good happens” approach work? Sure, but that doesn’t make it the optimal strategy or even a smart idea.
  • The Most Productive Low-Authority Hitters of All Time (FanGraphs) – Building on previous work, Tony Blengino identifies the ten hitters who were most productive despite not hitting the ball particularly hard. Former Padres players (and current staffers) Mark Kotsay and Mark Loretta crack the top five. Max Bishop, a personal favorite I wrote about in Best of Baseball Prospectus: 1996-2011, Vol. 1, appears farther down the list. Sorry kids, no Alexi Amarista.

Here’s some stuff I read this week that you might enjoy:

  • Removing the Fangs From Ty Cobb’s Notoriety (New York Times) – There’s a new book out about Cobb, and what author Charles Leerhsen discovered after four years of researching his subject surprised even him: “I thought I’d find new examples of monstrous monstrosity. Instead, I found a very different person than the myth. I was a little disappointed at first. He’s more normal than I thought.” Sounds like a great read, as is Cobb’s SABR biography.
  • The Braves are Salvaging a Salary Dump (FanGraphs) – As Jeff Sullivan notes, former Padres center fielder Cameron Maybin has stopped hitting so many groundballs in Atlanta. That and health are turning him into the player folks once envisioned him becoming. For now, anyway. [h/t reader Didi]
  • Attendance Update and the Angels’ Latest PR Mess (FanGraphs) – Through June 4, the Padres ranked 12th out of 30, just ahead of the Rangers and behind last year’s American League champion Royals. The Pads also have had the third largest gain from 2014, behind those same Royals and the hated Mariners (go figure). On the downside, literally, the Pads’ attendance slipped from April to May more than all but three teams. Hosting teams outside the division is a little different from hosting the Giants and Dodgers, who knew? That the Padres haven’t lived up to preseason hype probably doesn’t help either. Hey, at least they aren’t the Phillies.
  • Padres Pics #1 (The 5.5 Hole) – This new blog promises to be fun. Anything that starts with Kurt Bevacqua dressed as Dick Williams being harassed by umpires has to be good, right? Speaking of Padres from the ’80s, Wax Pack is a book due out in 2017 (plan ahead!) that author Brad Balukjian calls “the story of a single pack of 1986 Topps baseball cards and the attempt to track down each of the players inside nearly 30 years after they were bundled together with a stick of chalky bubblegum.” Balukjian will be interviewing the players in this single pack, including Garry Templeton. Pretty cool. Others in the pack with Padres ties are Gary Pettis, Randy Ready, and Rick Sutcliffe.
  • Padres draft RHP Austin Smith at No. 51 (San Diego Union-Tribune) – A.J. Preller likes his team’s first pick in the 2015 draft: “It’s a big body, good frame, big, strong and durable. Clean arm action, good delivery, and he shows three pitches.” MLB.com adds: “He works at 90-92 mph and tops out at 96 while looking like he’s just playing catch. He could sit in the mid-90s once he fills out his 6-foot-4 frame and gets more consistent.” Learn more about the Padres draft class (including third rounder Jacob Nix, who has an interesting backstory) at Draft Tracker 2015 and from our own Dustin.

Seth Smith had a great season. Well, he had a great four months. We’ll get to that in a moment, but first, a history lesson.

Fewer Hits Than Kajagoogoo

Formed in Leighton Buzzard in 1979… oh, wait, wrong history. You aren’t here to learn about the masterminds behind 1983’s “Too Shy.”

A Smiths reference would have worked better, but the world won’t listen.

Smith didn’t actually have fewer hits than Kajagoogoo, but he did have only 118, which tied him for 178th in franchise history for a single season. It also led the 2014 team. Here’s a partial list of Padres who had more in a season:

Player Year H OPS+
Ozzie Smith 1979 124 48
Enzo Hernández 1971 122 61
Enzo Hernández 1974 119 62
Dave Campbell 1970 127 65
Garry Templeton 1986 126 69

In the interest of hilarity, I’ve omitted several names and statistical categories. The point is, Smith led the team with fewer hits than some awful hitters.

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Some teams dominate the All-Star roster, and some teams get a lone rep.  Some teams always send position players and perhaps a pitcher every now and then, some teams just send one or the other.  In recent years, San Diego has been in the latter category of both.

The last two seasons, the Padres have only sent one representative, a pitcher.  Since moving to Petco, the Padres have sent a pitcher every year but two.  In 2004 Mark Loretta made the club as a second baseman, and in 2008 Adrian Gonzalez represented.  Gonzalez’s 2008 appearance was also the last time a position player went.  As Fangraphs’ Jeff Sullivan detailed yesterday, the 2013 Padres pitching staff leaves a little to be desired, so it’s likely their only rep this year will be a position player.  And for that, there is one obvious choice.

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This is where we gather from time to time to talk about something big in the Padres world or just the Padres or just baseball. It’s a roundtable discussion. Except, you know, no round tables. This is a Public House…so we’re at the bar.

*All opinions are of those who are attributed to them. No opinion here should be construed to be that of the collective.

Padres Trail wrote an excellent post a couple of weeks ago regarding the most seminal Padres moment. His choice, a fine one, was Game 3 of the 1996 NLDS. If you haven’t read his post already, go check it out here.

This topic got a lot of us thinking “what are our seminal Padres moments?” It’s a somewhat complicated topic for a team with 0 World Series titles and only 2 appearances. But seminal doesn’t necessarily mean “great.” They are moments, for better or worse, that stay with you. An easy way to test what moments these would be for you? They are the first moments that come to mind when you think “Padres.”

Here, we’ve limited ourselves to picking 3 moments in total. Some good, some bad, all memorable.

So, presented for this week’s roundtable discussion, The Bar presents “Seminal Padres Moments.”

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