If you don’t follow me on the twitter, I’m cutting back on writing for now. The mailbag has survived, however, and the mailbag is here.

Put me in the “sure, why not?” bucket here. When the Braves moved Freddie Freeman from first to third earlier this season, I thought it was an interesting experiment. Maybe the process behind it wasn’t great—the Braves moved their franchise cornerstone to clear room for a then scorching-hot Matt Adams—but I like the general idea of challenging guys to swim upstream on the defensive spectrum, particularly if there’s some athleticism/defensive skills present.

When Wil Myers moved from the outfield to first base initially, back toward the end of 2015, it looked like it might work out okay. The numbers said he played really good defense there last year, and he also added a bunch of runs on the bases. This season, however, he’s backpedaled in both of those areas, especially defensively, where the numbers and the eye test agree on the regression. Maybe his defensive skill-set just doesn’t work that well at first in the end, and he’ll be better off returning to an outfield corner, or even to third. He’d have more overall appeal if he could make things work defensively elsewhere on the diamond, though you could say that about any first sacker. Thing is, Myers hasn’t yet shown enough bat to cut it at first, at least not when other facets of his game aren’t firing.

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Earlier today the Padres traded Trevor Cahill, Brandon Maurer, and Ryan Buchter to the Kansas City Royals for Esteury Ruiz, Matt Strahm, and Travis Wood.

Woo-hoo, a trade!

Trades are hard to write about these days. The more credit we’ve given to teams for getting smarter and smarter, the easier it is to look at a deal and nod along: “yup, yup, makes sense. yup.” It’s really no different with this deal. The Padres had obvious trade candidates like Cahill, picked up for pennies and reconfigured into a legitimate starter, Maurer, a still-pretty-young reliever who’s consistently shown better peripherals and stuff than surface stats, and Buchter, something of a throw-in who offers some value as an always coveted lefty with good strikeout numbers, so they traded them. In return the Padres got back a pair of younger, interesting players and in the process made the major-league team worse for an anticipated, and choreographed, second-half swoon.

The Padres got back three players. One of them, Travis Wood, is unlike the others. He’s a 30-year-old veteran having an absolutely miserable year. So far in 41 2/3 innings out of the Royals ‘pen, Wood’s posted a gaudy 8.49 DRA, seventh-worst in all of baseball (min. 20 innings.). In fact, among pitchers with at least half their innings in relief, Wood is dead last in the majors. His cFIP, 112, offers some hope for non-disastrous performance going forward, but he’s fallen a long way since masquerading as a league-average starter a few years back with the Cubs.

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