what's brewing on the padres farm system

Cal Quantrill, RHP, High-A Lake Elsinore

Don’t tell Quantrill that the Cal League is supposed to be friendly toward hitters. He’ll stare you down, find the nearest baseball, and strike you out with 95 mph heat.

Quantrill’s latest masterpiece came against Rancho Cucamonga, on Tuesday night, against a lineup that included major-league rehabbers Logan Forsythe and Joc Pederson along with some legit prospects. Quantrill’s line: six innings, seven hits, 2 runs, 1 walk, and a career-high 12 strikeouts.

As others have noted, the most important thing the Padres can do with Quantrill is try to keep his arm healthy. Coming off Tommy John surgery in college, there’s no rush to push Quantrill up a level or work him for innings. We don’t know all that much about arm health, so just take it slow, monitor his condition after each start, and watch his innings and pitches. So long as the arm stays together, natural talent should carry Quantrill in whichever direction he points it.

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Here’s some stuff I read this week that you might enjoy:

  • Notes from the Field (Baseball Prospectus) – Chris King tells the story of Colt Daninos, a high school pitcher who has faced some adversity, to put it mildly: “Colt was born with a rare disease known as DiGeorge Syndrome. It is caused by a missing chromosome in his body and has many symptoms, including neuromuscular problems, learning disabilities, congenital heart disease, and many others. It has required Colt to undergo surgery 14 times; it required his entire spine to be fused together. It keeps him reading at a third-grade level and will likely prevent him from attending college.” This article is so full of awesome. You might need tissues. And heck, as long as we’re all having a good cry, go ahead and read this bit about the guy who proposed at a Tampa Bay Rays game.
  • James Shields on his Changeup, Longevity, and Age (FanGraphs) – Eno Sarris examines Shields’ signature pitch, mixing good research with good quotes. As for Shields, dude gets it: “The game evolves. Everyone around the league knows I have a changeup. Sometimes, if you see the guys are sitting on it, you’re going to throw other pitches.” Seems like common sense, but not everyone applies it. In other pitching news, Craig Kimbrel recently blew a save, which was unexpected enough that Jeff Sullivan had to dissect it. More pitching? David Kagan talks radar guns, which sort of qualifies and is interesting in any event. And speaking of radar guns, Ben Lindbergh wrote something cool [h/t Craig Elsten] that mentions Randy Jones.
  • Tate, Padres Haven’t Given Up On Career (Baseball America) – Bill Mitchell reminds us that Donavan Tate remains in the organization. The third pick overall in the 2009 draft, now 24, is at High-A Lake Elsinore (whose Diamond somehow didn’t make Baseball America’s list of best ballparks in the minors). Tate still believes in himself: “I can play at a high level. I can compete with anybody, so I think this is going to be a good year.” While his optimism is admirable, he is way behind the proverbial curve. Big-league success is probably unattainable at this point, but life success remains within his grasp. Here’s hoping. [h/t Mike Couzens]
  • The Mental ABCs of Postmodern Baseball: Searching for Every Possible Edge (Bleacher Report) – Scott Miller notes the growing trend among organizations to have a dedicated specialist that helps players with the mental side of baseball: making sure they get enough sleep (which Russell Carleton has discussed ($) in the past), improving their concentration skills, etc. Former Padres pitcher Bob Tewksbury has worked with the Boston Red Sox for much of the last decade in such capacity. And we’ve talked with San Diego resident Geoff Miller about his work with several big-league teams. It’s good to see decision-makers taking this area of expertise seriously. [h/t Corey Brock]
  • For ex-Dodgers star Matt Kemp, Padres offer chance at fresh start (SI.com) – Ben Reiter chats with Kemp about injuries, aging, and more. Money quote: “I can still run, but I can’t run like I used to run. I got to do a lot more maintenance, making sure my body is right. When I was younger, I could just get out of bed, go play a game and be good. I’ve got to warm up, get those muscles loose to get ready for a game. It’s a process now.” [h/t Brady Phelps]

Every once in a while, I like to just throw everything against the wall and see what sticks. Mostly it’s just a collection of minor happenings that generally don’t necessarily deserve a entire post dedicated to them.

(I thought renaming this using something about McRib “meat,” but that’s just gross.)

Photo courtesy of The Week and imgur

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In case you weren’t paying attention…

Always enjoy responsibly. Don’t read and drive.

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Back in March, it was announced that former first rounder (#3 overall in 2009) Donavan Tate would not be reporting to camp that Spring. No details were released other than it was “due to personal issues”. Despite getting the richest signing bonus in Padres history ($6.25 million) the once promising prospect had been plagued by injuries and off the field issues that have severely stunted his growth towards the Major Leagues. Woe, Doctor! did an excellent write up about Tate shortly after this was announced and questioned whether it was his “last hurrah” with the Padres or baseball in general.

As for Tate himself? Provided his personal issues don’t force him into retirement, despite many off-field mistakes, his pedigree and athleticism most likely ensure his career as a baseball player hasn’t flatlined. Whether or not this occurs with the Padres or any other organization is unclear, although any additional absence from baseball activity makes it increasingly unlikely.

Then this morning Corey Brock filled everyone in on the reason why Tate was out.

Instead of heading to Spring Training, Tate headed to California for the start of an exhaustive and, ultimately, enlightening, five-month treatment program.

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In case you weren’t paying attention…

I don’t know how to put this, but we’re kind of a big deal. We are very important. We have many leather-bound books and our mothers’ basements smell of rich mahogany.

Always enjoy responsibly. Don’t read and drive.

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