Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an evening at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (63-78) scored more runs than the St Louis Cardinals (72-68), 3-0, in their four-game series finale last night at Petco Park.

Clayton Richard (7-13, 4.78) shut the Cardinals out over six innings on five hits and a walk with five strikeouts. Craig Stammen, Kirby Yates, and Brad Hand each pitched one of the final three innings in relief.

Lance Lynn (10-7, 2.94) gave up one run on six hits and three walks while striking out three over six innings. Manuel Margot scored on Jose Pirela‘s infield single in the first inning. Wil Myers hit a two-run home run in the seventh inning.

The Padres head to Chase Field for three games against the Arizona Diamondbacks (82-58). Jordan Lyles (0-2, 6.71) gets the start tonight against Patrick Corbin (13-11, 3.83) beginning at 6:40pm PDT.
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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after a Sunday afternoon at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (62-75) scored more runs than the Los Angeles Dodgers (92-44) yesterday afternoon, 6-4, in the finale of four games at Petco Park.

Jhoulys Chacin (12-10, 3.96) allowed three runs (two earned) on five hits and no walks while striking out eight in seven innings. Chris Taylor led off the fourth inning with a solo home run and Curtis Granderson scored on a Justin Turner ground-rule double. Cody Bellinger scored on a Yasmani Grandal sacrifice fly in the seventh inning. Bellinger hit a solo home run in the ninth inning off Brad Hand.

Alex Wood (14-2, 2.57) gave up four runs on seven hits and three walks in six innings with seven strikeouts. In the first inning, Jose Pirela scored on a wild pitch to Yangervis Solarte as Wil Myers stole second base. Erick Aybar hit a two-run home run in the fourth inning. Pirela hit a solo home run in the fifth inning. With the bases loaded in the seventh inning, Myers singled to drive in Manuel Margot and Carlos Asuaje.

The St Louis Cardinals (69-67) come to Petco Park for four games beginning today at 1:40pm PDT. Luis Perdomo (7-8, 4.69) gets the start this afternoon against Carlos Martinez (10-10, 3.52).

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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an entire day at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres swept a doubleheader against the Los Angeles Dodgers yesterday.

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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an evening at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (59-74) scored more runs than the San Francisco Giants (53-82) last night, 5-0, in the finale of their three-game series at Petco Park.

Travis Wood (3-4, 5.70) pitched four and a third shutout innings, allowing six hits and four walks with one strikeout. Craig Stammen, Buddy Baumann, Kirby Yates, and Brad Hand combined to shut the Giants out over the final four and two-thirds innings.

Ty Blach (8-11, 4.68) gave up three runs on five hits and two walks while striking out one in five and two-thirds innings. Wood hit a solo home run in the third inning. Jose Pirela hit a solo home run, Wil Myers scored on a wild pitch by Kyle Crick, and Austin Hedges single drove in Jabari Blash in the sixth inning. Blash hit a single in the eighth inning to drive in Myers.

The Los Angeles Dodgers (91-39) come to Petco Park for four games beginning tomorrow at 7:10pm PDT. Dinelson Lamet (7-5, 4.60) starts tomorrow against Clayton Kershaw (15-2, 2.04), who comes off the disabled list to make his first start since July.
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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an evening at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (57-70) scored more runs than the St Louis Cardinals (64-63) in their three-game series finale at Busch Stadium last night, 4-3.

Luis Perdomo (6-8, 4.84) allowed two runs on seven hits and two walks with two strikeouts over six innings. Jedd Gyorko doubled in the fourth inning to drive in Dexter Fowler. Paul DeJong scored on a single by Yadier Molina in the sixth inning. Randal Grichuk hit a solo home run off Brad Hand to lead off the bottom of the ninth inning.

Carlos Martinez (10-9, 3.48) gave up two runs (one earned) in seven innings on seven hits and two walks with six strikeouts. Manuel Margot scored when Cory Spangenberg reached on an error and Matt Szczur singled to drive in Carlos Asuaje in the sixth inning. Asuaje drove in Jabari Blash with a single in the top of the ninth inning and Margot scored on Jose Pirela‘s sacrifice fly.

The Padres take on the Miami Marlins (63-63) for three games at Marlins Park beginning tonight at 4:10pm PDT. Travis Wood (3-4, 5.81) starts tonight’s game against Adam Conley (6-5, 4.93).
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Another Friday, another twitter mailbag.

Here’s how I’d rank the priorities of Andy Green this season, particularly for the last couple of months.

  1. Develop young players
  2. Develop older players/maximize their future trade value
  3. Keep good clubhouse moral and all that jazz
  4. Read at least one good book a week
  5. Go all-out to win games

On a contending team, those five things might be reversed (toss the books), but the Padres are 50-64, and they’re in no position to make any kind of run toward even the periphery of the playoff race. They’re not a winning team, and we essentially knew they weren’t going to be a winning team all season. They shouldn’t treat games the same way a winning team treats games.

Yesterday, in the seventh inning of a one-run game in Cincinnati, Green violated the hierarchy of priorities, putting no. 5 over no. 2 while brushing up against the warm fuzzies of no. 3 in the process, likely ticking off Kirby Yates. With runners on first and second, one out, and Joey Votto at the plate (in a 2-2 count!), Green yanked Yates for All-Star Brad Hand.

So, just to be clear here, Green brought Hand, an important future trade candidate, into a game in the middle of an at-bat against one of the best hitters in baseball to try to protect a one-run lead against direct tank competition.

What’s wrong with that move?

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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after a morning at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (50-64) scored fewer runs than the Cincinnati Reds (48-67) yesterday, 10-3, in the finale of four games at Great American Ballpark.

Dinelson Lamet (6-4, 5.12) gave up two runs on three hits and three walks in five innings with five strikeouts. Tucker Barnhart hit a two-run double in the second inning. In the seventh inning, with one out, Kirby Yates walked a batter, hit the next one, and went to two balls & two strikes against Joey Votto before Brad Hand was brought in. Hand walked Votto to load the bases and one out later Scooter Gennett hit a grand slam and Eugenio Suarez hit a solo home run back-to-back. In the eighth inning, Zack Cozart hit a two-run home run and Votto hit a solo home run back-to-back off Phil Maton.

Luis Castillo (2-5, 3.64) allowed three runs on six hits and three walks with four strikeouts in six innings. Wil Myers hit a solo home run in the fourth inning. In the fifth inning, Cory Spangenberg‘s double drove in Luis Torrens and Jose Pirela singled to drive in Spangenberg.

The Padres head to Dodger Stadium for three games against the Los Angeles Dodgers (80-33) beginning tonight at 7:10pm PDT. Clayton Richard (5-12, 5.17) gets the start tonight against Rich Hill (8-4, 3.47).
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In an trade deadline puzzler, the Padres held onto Brad Hand. Back in June, I was so sure that Hand was going to be dealt by July 31 that I traded him to every other team in the league, an article that now reads like a graveyard of what could have been. When I updated Hand’s most likely landing spots a few weeks back, I didn’t even consider the Padres as a top five contender.

What happened? In the simplest terms, it appears that the Padres set a high asking price—a fair initial stance for a pitcher of Hand’s quality—and the rest of the league failed to meet it, or even get close enough to make A.J. Preller & Co. budge. The complicated answer is, well, more complicated, and also unknown. Maybe it involves bits and pieces of some distrust of Preller, some distrust of Hand. Maybe it involves the Padres not budging enough from that initial asking price. More so, probably, it appears that the league as a whole decided to back off on dealing marquee prospects for last-ditch deadline improvements.

Justin Wilson, Hand’s most similar deadline comp, was traded to the Cubs, with Alex Avila, for Jeimer Candelario and Isaac Paredes, neither of whom cracked Baseball America’s midseason top 100. That’s a modest package, considering Avila, a one-year rental, is still a catcher OPSing .869. Addison Reed, another rental, was dealt from the Mets to the Red Sox for a trio of unexciting pitching prospects. Sonny Gray, mentioned in the tweet above, is a superb starter with 2.5 years left on his contract, and even he didn’t pry away one of the Yankees top prospects.

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Hey, another twitter mailbag. Thank you twitter.

In this type of scenario, I’m inclined to just say, hey, Wil Myers is what the overall numbers say he is. So far, in his career, Myers has a 110 wRC+. This year it’s 108. In 2015 and 2016 it was 115. So, he’s like a 110-115 wRC+ guy going forward, which is fine but not great for a first baseman.

However, with Myers, I still hold out some hope for more. And let’s be honest, we all want to be optimists at heart, drinking our water from glasses that are always half full.

Optimist point No. 1: Myers is just 26 years old. A solid player suddenly reaching new heights in his late 20s is far from unheard of; just of the top of my head, there are guys like Jose Bautista and Eric Thames that jump off the page. Bautista, for example, went from a below average hitter to one of the best hitters in the America League for a few years, right at age 29. It’d be silly to count on that from Myers, or anybody, but there’s always a chance things just suddenly click.

Optimist point No. 2: I still think it’d be worth looking into revamping his swing in the offseason. If it was working, fine, go with it. But there’s no good reason his swing has to look like that, especially when he’s hitting at a level below what both he and the Padres probably expect. It might be somewhat risky, but it’s possible that even just a swing tweak could set Myers on the right path.

Short answer: He’s probably something like what we’ve seen, but breakout potential exists. I’ll say he’s able to jump his wRC+ into the 120s or 130s, at least, for a few years here.

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Yesterday I wrote about the perceived trade value of three pitchers the Padres have already traded. Let’s just say it didn’t lock up the Padres Public servers. So, today, I thought I’d take a more conventional approach and discuss the relative trade value of the players still on the Padres roster.

I put everybody into made-up tiers.

Tier 1 is for primo guys. Andrew Miller‘s a tier 1 guy. Brad Hand isn’t, at least not unless he grows out the beard, steals some of Miller’s mojo, and hires Jeff Sullivan as his agent. In fact, the Padres don’t have any tier 1 players. (By the way, I didn’t consider young, unlikely-to-be-traded players like Manuel Margot in this exercise.)

Tier 2 is for good, solid trade chips. These are players that a bunch of teams are genuinely interested in, even if they lack some tier 1 mojo.

Tier 3 is for guys who aren’t good enough for tier 2. There’s some trade value here, but not a whole lot of it.

Tier 4 is for players who have little (or no) trade value.

Here we go.

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