Behind The Scenes Tour Of Petco Park Television Production Facilities

Last week I had the pleasure of touring some of Petco Park’s television production facilities. These aren’t the first photos I’ve published: in 2009 I posted photos from inside the Cox Channel 4 broadcast trailer back at the original Sacrifice Bunt. Hard to believe it’s been seven years.

This tour has more going for it: bigger, better photos, more locations, and a special, secret spot I’ve never seen of a tour visit. You’ll have to wait patiently to see what it is though. Or scroll to the bottom of this article, I guess.

First up is the trailer used by the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network (MASN) to cover the Orioles broadcast:

padres masn production trailer

This the MASN trailer that houses the producers who tell everyone what to do, and display graphics on screen. Behind this photo is a sign with a flamingo on it that says “No Flamingo’ing.” I thought “Flamingo’ing” was some sort of technical jargon, but it just means “Don’t lean with your foot on the wall.”

 

padres masn production trailer 2

This second MASN trailer houses the folks who record video, the audio engineer, and the video post producer. The people pictured are responsible for recording bits of the live broadcast to be used later. The audio engineer has a bunch of audio sources playing loudly at once, and told me how routing them all appropriately makes his job stressful. Another person in this trailer is in charge of video post production: changing color temperature and other details so colors look consistent across different lighting and camera conditions.

 

padres fox sports san diego trailer

This is the Fox Sports San Diego trailer. It seemed a little larger than the MASN trailers, but it houses everyone, rather than splitting into two. Because of this, the quarters are cramped, and slightly awkward while getting a tour without much personal space.

 

padres fox sports san diego trailer

The other side of the Padres’ trailer. No change in awkwardness.

 

padres press booth

The visitors’ television broadcast booth. It’s fairly narrow, but has a raised seating area behind where the broadcasters sit so a producer can see the game and communicate. When leaving we walked past the Padres booth. I looked in and Dick Enberg was standing right in front of me. We made awkward eye contact as I continued past.

 

The special secret spot? Photos inside the Petco Park batter’s eye!

padres batters eye

I’ve always wondered what this thing looks like on the inside. Behind me is just a staircase that leads back to the ground floor. So unless I missed something, the security guard who was seen in this section didn’t just wander to the room next door, he had to walk a short ways to get in.

 

padres batters eye view

Panoramic view from the Padres batter’s eye.

Hope you enjoyed the tour!

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  • ballybunion

    You should have just flashed your tour visitor’s ID at Dick and he would have relaxed. Security and all that. A guy on another website got to see the FSSD studio upgrades for the All Star Game – did you get a peek at that, or was it not ready when you toured? While they showed him the studio setup, he didn’t get to see the trailers, with the guts of the broadcasting art revealed, and that’s more interesting than an empty mockup.

    Did you see any bathrooms? Whenever I go on any tour, that’s the first thing I want to see: where they “go”, especially a place like the batter’s eye. You can tell a lot about the working conditions by the bathrooms, and I often test the facilities on those tours, to get a feel for what it’s like working there. It may not seem important to you now, but as you get older, it becomes a key part of any tour you take.