By now, you’ve seen the video. You’ve read all of the accounts. You’ve dissected the viral diagrams:

I’m not sure there’s a whole lot more to say on the issue of Anthony Rizzo‘s “slide” into Austin Hedges from Monday night, but the internet isn’t going to stop me from trying. So here are some disjointed thoughts.

That was a dirty slide. It’s obviously hard to determine whether Rizzo attempted to injure Hedges, but he clearly went out of his way to collide with him to presumably jar the ball loose. There’s a good chance that kind of collision, initiated by a 6-foot-3, 240-pound man, will injure the person on the receiving end, the one who’s standing still and not expecting the impact. So when Rizzo decided to leave the base path and not make a play toward home plate (i.e., to break the rules), he opted to do something with a good chance of injuring Hedges. Parse things all you want, Rizzo’s actions led directly to Hedges leaving the game. To make matters worse, both Rizzo and his manager, Joe Maddon, acted like jackasses after the game.

(By the way, I’m not saying Rizzo is a dirty player. No idea. He probably isn’t one, and it was a split-second decision in effort to help his team win a ball game. It was still a dirty play in the context of the rules and general sportsmanship.)

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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an evening at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (28-44) scored fewer runs than the Chicago Cubs (36-34), 4-0, at Wrigley Field last night.

Jhoulys Chacin (6-6, 4.95) allowed two runs on five hits and three walks in six innings with six strikeouts. Anthony Rizzo led off the bottom of the first with a home run. In the fourth inning, a single by Addison Russell drove in Kris Bryant, who had been hit by a pitch. Ian Happ hit a solo home run to lead off the Cubs’ eighth inning and Javier Baez scored before Albert Almora was thrown out at third base trying to stretch his double.

Mike Montgomery (1-3, 2.26) gave up three hits and no walks with four strikeouts while shutting the Padres out over six innings.

This afternoon’s series finale has Miguel Diaz (1-1, 7.36) getting the start at 11:20am PDT against Eddie Butler (3-2, 4.41).
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One of the hardest things about writing about a baseball team every day is trying to avoid looking like a fool. The easiest way to make yourself look like a fool is to get too excited—or too down—on a player with limited playing time. It’s easy to do, though. You see a hyped (or maybe under-hyped) prospect roll on to the big-league team and dominate in a couple of appearances, and you’re looking for something to write about. Before you know it you’re comparing him to Lance McCullers or something.

After Dinelson Lamet‘s first two starts, where he combined for 16 strikeouts and three walks in 10 innings, maybe I got a little too excited. The only thing worse than making yourself look like a fool once, however, is making yourself look like a fool twice. The easiest way to do this is to get too excited—or too down—on a player with limited playing time and then, after a few bad (or good) outings, to reverse course entirely. All of the sudden, you’re backpedaling away from this player as fast as you can. It’s a bad look, especially if the player turns out to be good, as you had originally envisioned, or even just okay, as you had maybe never considered.

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My thoughts about some recent goings-on I’ve seen concerning our Padres:

  • When Manuel Margot returns, Matt Szczur makes the most sense to be out righted. Franchy Cordero needs to work on some things, sure. His K rate is high, but is there really going to be a big difference in the stuff he sees in AAA vs MLB? He can man left field, and can be spelled by Jose Pirela versus tough lefties. I don’t think Cordero suffers development if he stays with the big club, and he is looking like the Padres 2nd best outfielder. Pirela is a solid bench bat and versatile utility glove that gives Manger Andy Green plenty of flexibility. Both players have been contributing with their bats in a very small sample size – (Franchy a 132 wRC+ in 74 PAs, Jose a 163 in 50). Matt Szczur has walked at a pretty good clip (17.4%) but not much else sporting an 85 wRC+ in 69 nice PAs.

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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an evening at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (28-43) scored fewer runs than the Chicago Cubs (35-34) last night, 3-2, in the first of three games at Wrigley Field.

Clayton Richard (5-7, 4.20) allowed two runs on five hits and three walks while striking out three in six and a third innings. Albert Almora scored on an Anthony Rizzo sacrifice fly in the third inning. In the seventh inning, Willson Contreras led off the inning with a home run and Almora doubled to drive in Javier Baez, who scored on a Jose Pirela fielding error.

In the bottom of the sixth inning, Kris Bryant flied out to Matt Szczur, who then threw out Rizzo as he tried to score. In the process, Rizzo did not slide, instead choosing to lead with his knees and ran into Austin Hedges, who held on to the ball.

Jon Lester (4-4, 3.83) gave up two runs on five hits and a walk with seven strikeouts in six innings. Pirela led off the game with a home run. And Yangervis Solarte hit a solo home run in the third inning.

Tonight, Jhoulys Chacin (6-5, 5.10) starts against Mike Montgomery (0-3, 2.56) in the series’ second game, with first pitch scheduled for 5:05pm PDT.
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what's brewing on the padres farm system

Last Tuesday night Padres Public converged on Eastlake, Ohio for a Midwest League game between the Fort Wayne TinCaps and the Lake County Captains. Nathan traveled from about a half hour away in Cleveland, and myself from somewhere in the middle of New York, a cool six-hour trip. Nathan made an additional appearance on Thursday night.

This is what we saw.

Ronald Bolanos, RHP

Bolanos, a 19 year old Cuban who signed last August for $2.25 million during A.J. Preller’s summer abroad, started his minor league career in extended spring training, but he was sent out to Fort Wayne in mid-May, and he’s now made 5 starts for the team. Thursday night was the fifth, and it was his longest start of the year, at 6 2/3 innings pitched. In his previous start, he went 5 innings, giving up 2 runs and striking out 9 batters against a very good Lansing team, his best start of the year. Thursday’s was on course to be better, but it had to settle for also quite good.
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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after a Father’s Day afternoon at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (28-42) scored fewer runs than the Milwaukee Brewers (38-33) at Miller Park yesterday, 2-1.

Luis Perdomo (1-4, 4.97) gave up two runs on eight hits and two walks in six innings with four strikeouts. In the sixth inning, solo home runs by Hernan Perez and Manny Pina were all the Brewers needed.

Jimmy Nelson (4-3, 3.67) pitched a complete game, allowing one run on six hits and two walks while striking out ten. Erick Aybar singled in the fifth inning and advanced to second on a fielding error by Keon Broxton as Cory Spangenberg scored the lone Padres’ run.

The Padres head to Wrigley Field for three games against the Chicago Cubs (34-34). Clayton Richard (5-7, 4.30) gets the start tonight at 5:05pm PDT against Jon Lester (4-4, 3.89).
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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an afternoon at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (28-41) scored more runs than the Milwaukee Brewers (37-33) yesterday, 7-5 in eleven innings, at Miller Park.

Dinelson Lamet (2-2, 7.50) gave up three runs on four hits and no walks while striking out twelve in six innings. The twelve strikeouts were the most by a Padres rookie pitcher since Oliver Perez‘ thirteen on July 7, 2002. For the second game in a row, all of the Brewers’ runs came from home runs. In the third inning, Orlando Arcia hit an inside-the-park and Eric Thames hit a two-run. Keon Broxton hit a two-run shot in the tenth inning off Brandon Maurer. Phil Maton struck out the final two Brewers’ hitters to record his first Major League save.

Chase Anderson (5-2, 2.92) pitched seven innings, allowing three runs on five hits and no walks with six strikeouts. Yangervis Solarte hit a solo home run in the second inning. In the fourth inning, Franchy Cordero scored on Hunter Renfroe‘s double. Wil Myers hit a solo home run in the sixth inning. Solarte hit a two-run home run in the tenth inning. In the eleventh inning, Cory Spangenberg led off with a home run and Chase d’Arnaud hit another two outs later.

Today’s series finale will pit Luis Perdomo (1-3, 5.16) against Jimmy Nelson (4-3, 3.67) starting at 11:10am PDT.
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Sometimes things can get a little fuzzy after an evening at the pub. Here’s a friendly reminder of what you may have missed while you were drinking.

The Padres (27-41) scored fewer runs than the Milwaukee Brewers (37-32), 6-5 in ten innings, last night in the first of three games at Miller Park.

Junior Guerra (1-1, 2.84) gave up four runs on two hits and four walks with three strikeouts in six innings. In the first inning, Wil Myers hit three-run home run and Hunter Renfroe hit a solo home run. Yangervis Solarte hit a solo home run in the eighth inning.

Miguel Diaz (1-1, 7.36) pitched three and a third innings, allowing four runs on five hits and a walk while striking out five. Travis Shaw hit a solo home run in the second inning. Keon Broxton hit a three-run home run in the fourth inning. Manny Pina tied up the ballgame with a solo home run in the eighth inning. And Eric Thames‘ walk-off solo home run ended the game in the tenth inning.

This afternoon Dinelson Lamet (2-2, 8.50) gets the start against Chase Anderson (5-2, 2.83) starting at 1:10pm PDT.
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what's brewing on the padres farm system

MacKenzie Gore, LHP, Whiteville HS (NC)
First round, third overall

Gore is like the high school version of two recent Padres draft picks, Eric Lauer and Joey Lucchesi. He’s got a different kind of scouting report than your usual coveted prep pitcher. There’s no blow-you-away velocity here—not yet, anyway. But Gore also has attributes rarely associated with a young pitcher. He possesses a deep repertoire of plus (or potential plus) offerings, he’s polished (at least for the HS breed), and he’s a super athlete, important for things like repeating mechanics and, ahem, staying healthy.

There are, of course, plusses and minuses in taking a high school pitcher this high. On the down side, there’s always plenty of risk attached to any pitcher, particularly a high school one. Gore, while dominant at the high school level, hasn’t proven that he can handle a professional workload or a professional hitter. And there’s always the issue of health, and being a good three or four years away, health is always an ominous shadow.

On the plus side, the Padres got a pitcher who hasn’t gone to college, where he’d potentially be abused to win a conference title or a game in Omaha. He’ll get professional instruction right away, where the Padres will be able to carefully handle his development and promotion schedule. Many major-league stars were drafted as high schoolers for a variety of reasons, and that’s part of the appeal here.

In a perfect world, Gore’s the right combination of upside and safety. That’s something of a rare mix, though the profile—any profile—still carries plenty of its own risk. Expect the Padres to take it easy with Gore early, but his advanced style could allow him to move through the lower levels somewhat quickly once he gets rolling. (Sac Bunt Dustin)

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