My Huge Poll(s): The Padres 2017 Promotional Schedule

The Padres released their 2017 promotional schedule on Tuesday. You may have missed it at first, as they did it via press release and posted it on social media around 4:15pm.

Padres Jagoff posted a piece about it on Gwynntelligence Wednesday morning, in which he compared the Padres 2017 giveaways and promotions with the ones from the Dodgers, Cubs, Indians, Red Sox, and Giants. To say he was underwhelmed would be an understatement.

Promotions and giveaways are supposed to be an incentive to get you out to the ballpark when you wouldn’t necessarily have gone. If you get something of perceived value – on top of the basic product – the product becomes more valuable. It’s not even Economics 101, it’s high school Intro to Economics, that one class that they only made me take for a single semester in my senior year.

The Padres are not good. The expectation is that they’re going to lose a lot of games this year. Now, they won’t necessarily tell us that straight up, but it doesn’t take an astrophysicist to do the math. So, why would their promotional schedule be so underwhelming? I would think they would like to get people in the ballpark on Saturdays, however these promotions probably wouldn’t inspire anyone on the fence to get to Petco Park this season.

Tuesday night, I posted a poll on Twitter. I wanted to get an idea of what the folks on Twitter thought about these giveaways.

I chose the four middle-of-the-road (as I saw it) giveaways to find out if people would actually go out to the ballpark specifically because they were giving something away. I knew that the Knockaround sunglasses always get a solid crowd and that whatever that Padres hat in July is it would likely also get a good turnout. I also don’t consider Opening Day a giveaway day, because they’re going to come really close to selling that out no matter what, especially with the Giants in town.

The hoodie t-shirt (and let there be no doubt, it is just a long-sleeve t-shirt) got more than half of the votes in my completely unscientific poll. Followed by the replica jersey with just under a quarter of the votes and the beach mat (I’m still not sure what exactly that is) getting just under 1/5th of the votes.

As you can see, the fedora wasn’t all that popular compared to the other three choices, but I’ll have more on that in a little bit.

Wednesday morning, I decided to get a little more detailed about whether or not people actually wanted what the Padres were going to give away. Without saying as much, I wanted to find out if fans would spend money for tickets for these giveaways versus any other game of the season. You know, high school economics.

Out of the 72 people who voted, a little over half say they wouldn’t buy tickets for a hoodie t-shirt. Yet the Padres have given away versions of this for a couple of years now. How popular is it, really? The buzz around them seems to be sort of meh, at best.

What is it with the Padres and fedoras? 87% of the 67 that voted say they wouldn’t buy tickets for a fedora giveaway. Last year, the Padres gave them out on Opening Day. And they were still giving them out for the prospect showcase game in October. The person handing them out at the gate tried to give me one and I politely declined.

I went to the first game they gave fedoras away, July 13, 2013, and Tim Lincecum threw a no-hitter. That fact alone should have disqualified the fedora from ever being a Padres giveaway again. But here we are in 2017 and they’re still doing it.

Enough already. Let the fedora die.

Despite the total and complete boring blah-ness of the 2017 jersey, people still want the free giveaway version. Well, about 54% of them do, anyway. I’m not one of them, mostly because the 2017 jerseys are uninspired and dull.

75% say no to whatever a beach mat is. That’s a lot, right? It seems like a lot.

I’d bet good money that beach towels would get a better response. But what do I know?

Wait–the Padres aren’t giving away a bobblehead. Bobbleheads don’t do well in San Diego. What the f**k?

I added this poll to show that while bobbleheads may not do well in San Diego, the demand is still there. And I wasn’t talking about those Theme Night bobbleheads where you actually paid a premium for your tickets and were “rewarded” with a zombie or Ghostbusters bobblehead. Those don’t count because they’re not giving those away. You’re paying for them when you buy your tickets.

As you can clearly see, the 83 people who voted overwhelmingly chose yes, they would show up for a bobblehead giveaway. Yes, I know it’s a small sample size, on Twitter, and yada yada yada. But take a chance, for Pete’s sake.

 

Why are the Padres so reluctant to take chances with their giveaways? No idea.

However, I have a screwball theory.

Over the years, I’ve found out that giveaways are paid for entirely by the sponsors. The Padres merely present the idea to them for a Yea or Nay on if they want to partner on it. My theory is that the sponsors don’t want to stray off the well-beaten path they’ve been traveling. Toyota has been sponsoring Padres giveaways forever, but I can only remember t-shirts, hats, and beach towels with the Toyota logo. Never something like a snow globe or an LED light bulb (granted, a light bulb is more Sempra Energy‘s bailiwick, but still). Toyota likes t-shirts, so, by gum, they’ll pay for t-shirts!

Whatever the reason, the promotional schedule has been disappointing for a couple of years now. And the fact that they didn’t hype it up instead of basically sending out a single tweet about it says a lot, in my eyes.

Look at it this way, it could be worse. We could be Diamondbacks fans.

dbackspromos

Wait–That’s a bobblehead. Son of a b

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  • ballybunion

    I strongly suspect this weak stew of giveaways is the aftermath to the departure of Mike Dee. His strategy was to give the good stuff to the special group sections that paid extra, rather than all the fans at the game. Even when they were general giveaways, it wasn’t ALL the fans, just the first 30,000, or first 20,000.

    Geez, the giveaways at Qualcomm were for everybody, and there were 60,000+ seats, all filled for the annual cap night, and beach towel night! We’ll have to wait for the replacement President or CEO who takes over promotions and whips it into shape, because the people Dee left behind surely don’t know how to keep a fan base happy.