Fox Sports San Diego announced earlier today, that Julie Alexandria will be taking over as the San Diego Padres sideline reporter for the 2016 season. She replaces Kris Budden, who spent the previous two seasons in that role.

Dick Enberg, Mark Grant, Mike Pomeranz and Mark Sweeney, will all be returning to their previous roles, while former Red Sox announcer Don Orsillo will be joining the broadcast team in an unknown capacity.

This will be Alexandria’s 3rd MLB team that she has worked for, after the New York Mets and Washington Nationals.

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Rick and Chris catch up on all sorts of Padres topics in Episode 31, covering Matt Kemp’s cycle, Jedd Gyorko playing shortstop, the Padres’ manager sitch, and plans for 2016. Catch the fever!

If you have any questions or comments, leave them down below or e-mail us.

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There it goes … deep fly ball, way back in left field … aaaaand it falls harmlessly into the waiting glove of Scott Hairston on the edge of the warning path, and the Padres escape further damage.”

Perhaps you’ve heard that call — or one like it — from Dick Enberg, who has been announcing Padres games for the past five years. Enberg will call 60 or so games next year, then give way to Don Orsillo and call it a career. It’s been a brilliant run, mind you, but his late-career send-off in San Diego has come with mixed reviews. Sure, he’s still got that good, big game voice, and he calls a fine game for the most part, but the strange quirks — the warning paths, the hubba-hubbas (oh my, the hubba-hubbas), the occasional mispronounced name — seem to annoy more than they endear. I’d argue Enberg has actually improved a great deal throughout his gig with the Padres, particularly in his on-air chemistry with partner Mark Grant, a major credit to a man who has been in broadcasting for nearly 60 years. Forget that, though, we’re here for one reason.

What’s the deal with warning path?

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On the surface, the Padres’ hiring of now former Red Sox announcer Don Orsillo, a move San Diego made official last Wednesday, looks like a Mike Dee-led familiarity play. In fact, it probably is. Dee worked for the Red Sox from 2002 through 2009, mostly as COO, and Orsillo was Boston’s lead play-by-play guy — teaming in the booth with Jerry Remy — since 2001. It’s hard to imagine Dee’s familiarity with Orsillo didn’t have something to do with the hiring.

Maybe that’s unfortunate. Maybe Jesse Agler, who will be transitioning to the radio side from his all-around role this year, was the right person for the job. Maybe someone else — some relative unknown — should have gotten the nod, helping the Padres build a true identity of their own. If there’s any criticism of the deal — and there is some, mind you — it’s that Orsillo represents Boston, and, well, this ain’t Boston.

It’s true, mostly. Orsillo, 46, was born in Melrose, Massachusetts, a (Vladimir Guerrero) stone’s throw from Boston, and he grew up in New England, although he did graduate from high school in California. He returned east for college, though, and interned with the Red Sox while attending Northeastern. Further, nearly his entire announcing career comes from within the Red Sox organization (I’m Wikipedia-ing here) — the internship, five years calling Pawtucket Red Sox games on the radio from 1996-2000, and, of course, the lead role at NESN for the past 15 years.

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In case you missed it, Sac Bunt Chris and myself had the awesome honor of being on Padres Social Hour last Friday, mere hours after the trade deadline. We both had a blast and a huge thank you goes out to Jesse, Blooper (Seth), Nicky and the poor intern who had to fetch us unwrapped Watermelon Jolly Ranchers, cut into 3rds and soaked in a bowl of strawberry lemonade, during every commercial break. We are so demanding.

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Rany Jazayerli wrote a 4,700 word treatise at Grantland on the Padres yesterday, much of which provides an excellent outsider’s perspective on A.J. Preller’s first offseason as general manager. While I agree with a number of Jazayerli’s points (the Grandal-Kemp trade was never a good idea), I think the tone of the article ends up being too harsh on Preller and the Padres. Some thoughts:

But for a guy who made his name in the slow burn of player development, Preller the GM decided that he no longer needed time as an ally. Patiently building the Padres into a perennial contender wasn’t enough for Preller — he was going all in from day one.

Here’s the thing, which Rany thoroughly addresses in following paragraphs — the Padres had been stuck in “patiently building mode” for the better part of the last couple of decades, and it wasn’t working. It’s certainly possible that building from within is still the best way for the Padres to reach some level of sustainable success, but there’s probably a decent chance the Padres’ owners and front office higher-ups — the guys who hired Preller — didn’t want to hear it. As others have discussed, it’s possible, perhaps even likely, that agreeing to attempt to make the Padres into a contender right away was one of the main reasons Preller was hired. The offseason shakeup might have been less about Preller’s grand philosophy or roster-building and more a prerequisite to being hired.

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Judson Richards of XTRA 1360 comes at Padres and Pints with straight talk about his experience getting into sports radio, tales of his time in the minors participating in bench clearing brawls, and his thoughts on Pat Murphy as the manager of the San Diego Padres.

Follow Judson Richards on the Twitters, catch him on XTRA1360 from 6-8pm Monday – Friday, and check out his work online.

If you have any questions or comments, leave them down below or e-mail us.

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It’s been an exciting offseason, hasn’t it? That being said, there are a few things that we here at Padres Public haven’t necessarily been on top of.

Okay, the fact is that Dustin and Nate do a great job of recapping & analyzing trades and roster moves. I, on the other hand, do not. Other than complaining about Alexi Amarista playing center field, I tend to focus on the ballpark experience, media, and public relations.

I guess what I’m saying is that by “we,” I mean me. I haven’t been on top of things.

So, here’s a couple of items that have come up in the last week or so.

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Sometimes letters never reach their intended targets, instead becoming lost, abandoned, or otherwise discarded amongst the abundance of flyers and coupons in the mailperson’s sack. Sometimes those letters end up at the doorstep of the Padres Public headquarters, where we promptly publish them. Here are some of those letters.

Mr. Mike Dee,
CEO, San Diego Padres Baseball Club.
August 28, 2014

Mr. Dee — I am writing to compliment you on the latest addition to Petco Park, the Bud Selig Plaza. It is my understanding that a few rabble rousers have pitched a fit over this development. Please, pay them no attention. There is no better way to honor someone like Bud Selig, a commissioner who has accomplished so much good for not only baseball in general but for the San Diego Padres, than to name a piece of Petco Park after him. In fact, Selig has done so much good for San Diego during his tenure that it almost becomes impossible to recite what – exactly — he has done. Don’t worry, you don’t have to expound to me. It’s more than apparent that Selig was instrumental in the creation of Petco Park and, perhaps more importantly, in orchestrating the purchase of the Padres by the current O’Malley/Fowler ownership group.

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